Weeds or Wonderful Willing Wildlings ?

 

DO not edit…….see file

Weeds or Wonderful Willing Wildlings ?

“LET ALL THE WORLD SAY WHAT THEY WILL

SPEAK OF ME AS YOU FIND”

FROM A CROSS STITCHED SAMPLER.

////////////////////////////////////////////////

Edit only word doc rewilding ed
To naturalise a plant
is to
establish it, or let it establish itself,
so that it lives wild
in a natural situation
in a self sustaining way,
but in a region where it is not indigenous.
[1]

Edit only word doc rewilding ed
To naturalise a plant

Certain particular kinds of plants, left to themselves in a habitat to which they are suited, are able to thrive without much attention from us. They return every year and increase their colonies.  These are the ‘ plants that plant themselves ‘.

The offspring of such capable, pre-adapted parent plant types are our potential naturalisers, willing and able.

From among the many plant possibilities in this wildling category, one might select only those that happen to have inherent characteristics both pleasing and problem solving for your purposes.Just the most beautiful and useful kinds, for your purposes. These to us and the other living things in their ecotome. These we can bring into our own landscapes.

Among these wildlings there are lots of plants one could love for good reasons. There are quite a few that I wouldn’t want to make a garden without.

Apply any garden wish criteria you like, and then find ones that grant your  garden wishes. Of course they should be handsome plants, look great for a long while every year, come back reliably on their own, and need little maintenance.

Give them an Opportunity to prove their worth. It’s only fair.

INSERT slideshow

KIND BY KIND

Each variety of naturalising plant deserves to be considered on its own merits.
Like medicines for circumstances,
qualities of particular kinds of these willing plants can provide solutions to common landscape problems.

One wants those preadapted to thrive despite the difficult conditions that a certain place continually faces, and few cultivated plants could withstand. The wildlings can occupy the same niches where otherwise there would be random patches of not very attractive or desirable kinds of plants. Hmmm we could replace them with chosen wildlings. Swap em out.

The Plant colonies we encourage become links for the patchwork wildlife corridors of our country, providing reliable sustenance for insects, birds and various creatures. If we select the plants with the best characteristics from a human perspective, we get to enjoy them ornamentally with very little work. Every living thing wins. Nothing wrong with that, and you can help. It’s like voting, you choose and encourage those plants you think best, and they continue on.

The plants I refer to come back every year with little or no help from us, although as their colonies mature and disperse, you may have to practice some subtractive gardening. This is editing, way easier than getting difficult plants to establish.

“I think wildness matters more now than it ever has.
We’re urbanizing at a pace unprecedented in human history…
We have to look at the landscapes we live in as places where nature could be.

– Thomas Rainer

 

IT IS SUBJECTIVE, YOU DECIDE !

Geoffrey Charlesworth, upon being asked how he decided between the many hundreds of promising varieties of plants he started from seed each year, since one can’t keep them all, responded simply,

“If its a good plant I keep it, if its a bad plant I take it out.”

The lesson is that you try it and You decide if a plant in a given context has merit, and if not, you take it out ! You are the editor of your plants.

The trouble is there are so many possible plants to try. Some you probably would not like in the end.

I will imagine if you had a Select List of Candidates to choose from, it would help you find the right wildlings for your future pleasure/landscape.

Listed below are favorites selected over 35 years of opportunity….reliable beautiful, and few bad habits……kinds that can very pleasing.

 I will imagine if youhad a Select List of Candidates to choose from, it will be faster to a good result. Listed below are favorites….reliable beautiful, and few bad habits……kinds that can very pleasing.

CLUES and RUTHLESSNESS

If you have a plant that you want to rogue out, having given the matter some thought, when finding it undesirable for your purposes, of course you can move it or delete it.

BUT BEFORE you weed anything out ( rogue out the beds), It will be useful to note the precise places where the rogues have grown very well. That way, some preferred wildlings of your own choosing can be planted in the proven propitious locations that the rogues have found over time. You won’t want lose track of these exact places, so the ideal moment to weed out the rogues is when you have some chosen plants at the ready to replace them. This works especially well in developing stone walls, rock outcroppings and ledge.

NOW Rogue out, freshen up the earth suitably, then put in the good guys you want to encourage.

WHERE DID THE WILDLINGS COME FROM ?

ESCAPEES

Some Wildlings could be called Escapees, since they started out in tended gardens decades or centuries ago.
Treasured in their old home grounds for some medicinal, ornamental or agricultural merits they possessed, they were carefully brought to a new home, whether by seeds, in a tin box or in a potato. Assisted migration.
Once in home cultivation, some  pre-adapted kinds escaped and established themselves in suitable habitats nearby. Many are useful and beautiful.

NATIVES

Some varieties of Wildlings are actually perfectly respectable native plants, but many of their traditional habitats are in process of being diminished by bulldozers, chemistry or otherwise, they would benefit by our ‘sponsoring’ them in places where they can thrive in our cultivated landscapes. This acceptance begins by noticing them, choosing from among them those kinds that are handsome and/or useful and moving them to new places of safety so not to lose those varieties of plants.

VOLUNTEERS AND CASUALS

The old fashioned non-judgemental American word used when thinking of these preadapted plants is ‘Volunteers’. In Britain, such naturalising plants may be referred to as ‘Casuals’. Nicely non-judgemental.

The idea of a garden is forever, but individual plants don’t always return. It is good to have some things that you know are so happy in your place that they will be coming back forever through the generations of new individuals, though the parents can’t stay.

There are uncounted numbers of casuals that may be candidates for our landscapes. Different ones will be suitable depending on your climate and the character of your landscape. In one zone a handsome plant may be a modest self sower, and someplace substantially warmer it may be a pestilential nuisance, no matter how lovely it may otherwise be. Look around. It is good to gather local information before you set out on your home trials.

When you use a plant in a landscape, you vote for it for the future. Your choices can help the worthy ones to become more widely known, and so to colonise more places to which they are well suited. It seems fair to carefully consider the willing candidates and select certain of these volunteers for promotion.

 

DEFINING WEEDS

Opportunistic, naturalising plants – any that sow themselves around, turning up in places that we did not plant them., whether good or bad plants – often get lumped together into the disparaging category of ‘weeds’.

There are more diplomatic (fair) terms to use to describe these willing plants until we decide if we like them or not for a particular context.

 If we call all the volunteering kinds of plants ‘weeds’ they will disappear indiscriminately. Unwanted wildlings we could call ‘weeds’ or ‘rogues’ but please first look and see which ones you like and which ones to exclude.

ROGUE

1. a dishonest or unprincipled person, especially a man; rascal; scoundrel

(Agriculture)

a. To identify and remove such plants

as are inferior, diseased, or of an unwanted variety (all rogues).

 

I think of weeding as roguing out.

Sometimes the rogue will be a kind of plant one even likes but one can have too much of a good thing.
Excess (even excellent) plants, can also be treated as rogues – you apply editorial discipline by subtractive gardening.

As it is often said – a weed is just a word for a plant you don’t like for some considered reason in a place.
These we can rogue out. Preferably when they are small.

CAUTIONS

We must choose the kinds of wildlings thoughtfully. Willingness can be an attribute in a plant, but one has to be careful what is encouraged and where. If a habitat is already occupied by some other desirable, stable but perhaps less vigorous kinds of plants, you may lose the weaker ones to the eager ones if you don’t watch over things.

With larger sized volunteering plants especially, I would avoid any kinds that will be difficult to practice subtractive gardening on. You won’t want to introduce things that are too fast growing and /or multiplying, woody or deep rooted, unless you have looked into the matter carefully and have your own considered reasons.
A certain kind of plant may be a modest and appealing colonist in one zone, but may turn brown in the season or reproduce unacceptably much in some other zone or ecotome, so consider each of the wildlings you bring in by kind in relation to your particular location.

SOME VOLUNTEERS TO ENJOY

 From experience, I can recommend the following plants as possible candidates if you are near our Zone 5B.

 Those that I have written about elsewhere are linked to articles that contain further information about them.

  1. 1.  Aster linarifolius
  2. 2.  Corydalis sempevirens
  1. 3.  Corydalis lutea and lutea alba
  1. 4.  Gitta’s Zurich Larkspur

 

  1. 5.  Linaria Canon Went

 

Here mixed with the Purple form of  this linaria.

  1. 6.  Euphorbia cyparissias

 

Forget Me Nots

 

The key to living happily with forget-me-nots is when they dont look nice as plants any more, just pull them out and shake the seeds where you want plants in future.
See if you can find the different colors in someone’s garden, the white and pink are lovely to have.

Beware of a teensy flowered kind that looks ratty from day two or so, and takes over good forget me not territory. I rogue those out.

 

  1. 7.  Johnny jumpups = Viola tricolor which cross w/each other and V. cornuta

The foreground plants are Saxifraga london pride and Hosta pandora

 

  1. 8.  Viola koreana

 

  1. 9.          Geranium Robertsonianum, Known as Herb Robert.
  2. 10.          Gypsophila muralis Tiny but many.

 

  1. 11.          Chrys parthemium. with Corydalis lutea

 

  1. 12.          Kenilworth Ivy

Alchemilla, Ladies Mantle

And there are many sizes of Alchemillas, each one willing and able.

Alchemilla mollis to Alchemilla alpina in a different scale.

 


[1] Merriam Webster, web

Edit ONLY on THIS DOCV not on blogpost

WONDERFUL WILDLINGS

“LET ALL THE WORLD SAY WHAT THEY WILL

SPEAK OF ME AS YOU FIND”

FROM A CROSS STITCHED SAMPLER.

 

To naturalise a plant
is to
establish it, or let it establish itself,
so that it lives wild in a natural situation
 
in a self sustaining way,
but in a region where it is not indigenous

ed 1/15/18

Certain particular kinds of plants, left to themselves in a habitat to which they are suited, are able to thrive without much attention from us. They return every year and increase their colonies. 

These are the ‘ plants that plant themselves ‘.
The offspring of such capable, pre-adapted parent plant types are our potential naturalisers, willing and able.

From the many thousands of plant possibilities in this wildling category, one might select only those kinds that happen to have inherent characteristics which are both pleasing and problem solving in your situation.These we can bring into our own landscapes.

Among the wildlings there are lots of plants one could love for good reasons. There are quite a few that I wouldn’t want to make a garden without. Then there are some which will be invasive and difficult to control. We will try to avoid those.

If we select the plants with the best characteristics from our perspective, we get enjoy them ornamentally-with very little work.
Of course they should be handsome plants, look great for a long while every year, come back reliably on their own, and need little maintenance. Choose your size and color. Apply any garden wish criteria you like, and then find the wildlings that grant those personal garden wishes.

Your personal selections can help the worthy ones to become more widely known, and so help them to have the opportunity to colonise more places for which they are naturally well suited.

Every living thing wins. Nothing wrong with that. Selfish unselfishness.

YOU CAN HELP.
When you use a plant in a landscape, it’s likevoting for it. You choose and encourage those plants you think best, and they will continue on.

Among the wildlings there are lots of plants one could love for good reasons. There are quite a few that I wouldn’t want to make a garden without.

KIND BY KIND
Each variety of naturalising plant deserves to be considered on its own merits. Like medicines for circumstances, particular kinds of these willing wildlings have qualities which can provide solutions to common landscape problems.
If you observe which difficult conditions a certain location continually faces, you can select handsome hardy wildlings from amongst kinds preadapted to thrive in such places. These chosen plants can then occupy the same locations where otherwise there would be random patches of most likely not very attractive or desirable kinds of plants.

Hmmm, we could replace the random existing plants with chosen wildlings. Swap em out.

The wildling plant colonies we encourage become organic links within the patchwork wildlife corridors of our country, providing a link in the chain of reliable sustenance for insects, birds and other creatures.

Their willingness may mean lots of babies in their vicinity As their colonies mature you will probably practice some subtractive gardening. This is editing, way easier than getting fussy plants to establish.

“I think wildness matters more now than it ever has.
We’re urbanizing at a pace unprecedented in human history…
We have to look at the landscapes we live in
as places where nature could be.”

– Thomas Rainer

 IT IS SUBJECTIVE, YOU DECIDE !

Geoffrey Charlesworth, renowned horticulturist and author, upon being asked how he decided between the many hundreds of promising varieties of plants he started from seed each year at his own place, since one can’t keep them all, responded simply,

“If its a good plant I keep it, if its a bad plant I take it out.”

The lesson is that you try it and you decide if a plant has merit in a given context, and if not, you take it out ! You are the editor of your plants.

Be aware that In one zone a handsome plant may be a modest self sower, and someplace substantially warmer it may be a madcat sower and a nuisance, no matter how lovely it is to look at or eat. It is good to look around and gather local information from other gardeners and plantsmen before you set out on your home trials.

The trouble is there are so many possible plants to try. Some you probably would not like in the end.

FAVORITES SHORT LIST

I will imagine that if you had a Carefully Selected List of Wildling Candidates to choose from, it would help you find the right ones for your future landscape pleasure.

Listed below are some unusual favorites, those willing ones that I have most enjoyed..

I have selected these through using them in my work over many years, These are some with wonderful attributes and few drawbacks in appropriate places.

All are reliable and, to my eyes, beautiful.

The links in the photos will take you to more information about each kind,  descriptive stories about each from within my own writing. You will want to know about their appearance and behaviour in the landscape to decide if they may be suitable for your contexts.

WHERE DID THE WILDLINGS COME FROM ?

ESCAPEES
Some Wildlings could be called Escapees, since they started out in tended gardens decades or centuries ago. Treasured in their old home grounds for medicinal, ornamental or agricultural merits they possessed, they were carefully brought to new homes, whether by seeds, or rooted in a tin box or a potato. Assisted migration.

Once in home cultivation, some  pre-adapted plant types escaped and established themselves in suitable habitats nearby. Among them are edibles and many ornamentally beautiful kinds.

NATIVES

Some other varieties of Wildlings are actually perfectly respectable native plants, whose habitats may be in process of being diminished by bulldozers, chemistry or otherwise. We can all hope that from amongst these, the native varieties that are handsome and/or useful will be noticed and moved to new places so not to lose those kinds of plants. You can help. It’s like voting, you choose and encourage those you think best, and they continue on.

VOLUNTEERS AND CASUALS

The old fashioned non-judgemental American word used when thinking of these preadapted plants that jump around in the landscape here and there is ‘Volunteers’. In Britain, such naturalising plants may be referred to as ‘Casuals’. Nicely non-judgemental.

The idea of a garden is forever, but individual plants have life spans. It is good to have some things that you know are so happy in your place that they will be coming back forever through the generations of new individuals even if the parents can’t stay.

There are uncounted numbers of casuals that may be candidates for our landscapes. Different ones will be suitable depending on your climate, the character of your landscape and what you want to accomplish. There are more diplomatic (fair) terms to use to describe these willing plants until we decide if we like them or not in a particular context.

DEFINING WEEDS

Opportunistic, naturalising plants, turn up in places that we did not purposely plant them. All those kinds that by their nature sow themselves around often get lumped together into the disparaging category of ‘weeds’, whether good or bad plants.

 Unwanted wildlings we could call ‘weeds’ or ‘rogues’ but please first look and see which ones you might seriously like and which ones you choose to exclude.

- a weed is just a word perhaps most useful to describe a plant you don’t like for some considered reason in a place.

 

If we call all the volunteering kinds of plants ‘weeds’ they will disappear indiscriminately.

because these are such good doers and are satisfying over a long seas on th g with little mainten other than subtraction they are in my mind very desirable

Either you have to want a lot of them or you need to be ruthless in taking away extras, which is usually a physically easy task if done when they are small. So you just need to stay ahead of this pleasant game and you will be rewarded with full and reliable pleasing pictures. Enthusiastic things like these can be planted and then will self plant serendipitously in areas where it is improbable that more cultivated and well behaved things could manage

Serendipity adds a lot to the mix…….the element of surprise and delight

 

ROGUE

I think of weeding as roguing out.  You are editing your beds so that they lok the way you want them to, and everything thrives. Sometimes the rogue will be a kind of plant one even likes alot but doesn’t need so many of. One can have too much of a good thing. Excess (even excellent ) plants, can also be treated as rogues – you apply discipline.Preferably when they are small.

You edit by moving things around and subtracting until things look the way you want them to.

“To Rogue”
 means “To identify and remove such plants

as are inferior, diseased, or of an unwanted variety”
So it is our job.

I rogue, you rogue, he rogues, she rogues.

 

CLUES and RUTHLESSNESS

If you have a plant that you want to rogue out, having given the matter some thought, finding it undesirable for your purposes, of course you can move it or delete it.

BUT BEFORE

you weed anything out ( rogue out the beds), It will be useful to note the precise places where the rogues have grown very well. That way, some preferred wildlings of your own choosing can be propitiously planted in the proven locations the rogues have found over time. You wont want lose track of these exact places, so the ideal moment to weed out the rogues is when you have some chosen plants at the ready to replace them.

Rogue out, freshen up the earth suitably, then put in the good guys you want to encourage. This works especially well in developing stone walls, rock outcroppings and ledge.

CAUTIONS

We must choose the kinds of naturalisers carefully.
-
Willingness can be an attribute, but one has to be careful what is encouraged and where. If a habitat is already occupied by some other desirable, stable but perhaps less vigorous kinds of plants, you may lose the weaker ones to the eager ones if you don’t watch over things.

-A certain kind of plant may be a modest and appealing colonist in one zone, but get leggy and brown or reproduce prodigiously in some other zone, so consider each of the wildlings you bring in by kind for your ecotome.

With larger sized volunteering plants especially, I would avoid any kinds that will be difficult to practice subtractive gardening on. You won’t want to introduce things that are too fast growing and /or multiplying, especially if they are woody or deep rooted, unless you have looked into the matter carefully and have your own considered reasons.


SOME VOLUNTEERS TO ENJOY

 From experience, I can recommend the following plants as possible candidates if you are near our Zone 5B.

 Those that I have written about elsewhere are linked to articles that contain further information about them

 

1.  Aster linariifolius

2.  Corydalis sempevirens  

3.  Corydalis lutea and lutea alba

 

4.  Gitta’s Zurich Larkspur  

5.  Linaria Canon Went

 

Here mixed with the original Purple form of this Linaria.

They flower for 2 months and their foliage looks great for twice that long.  

The common name is purple toadflax, which seems make this garden frog very proud.

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